Archived CU SRP Seminars

September 15 2014

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Dr. Nath presented "As free drinking water sources in Ganges-Brahmaputra basin"; Dr. Chen discussed findings from Bangladesh HEALS study on As and cardiovascular disease

This seminar/webinar included two talks on exposure and health impacts related to arsenic. Dr. Bibhash Nath, recently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Geosciences at the University of Sidney, presented, “Arsenic free groundwater sources in the Ganges-Brahmaputra river basin: A field example from West Bengal (India)”. Dr. Yu Chen, Associate Professor with the Departments of Population Health (Epidemiology) and Environmental Medicine at the Langone Medical Center of New York University gave a talk entitled “Arsenic and cardiovascular disease in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS):  gene-arsenic interaction, changes in longitudinal blood pressure, and preliminary data in adolescents”..

 

Sponsored by: Columbia University NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: Lamont Hall, Worzel Seminar Room, first floor Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 61 Route 9W, Palisades, New York
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Dr. Nath's seminar presentation9.95 MB

May 19 2014

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Alison Sanders on Early life metal exposure and epigenetics; Hun Bok Jung on Spatial and temporal scales of redox trapping of groundwater arsenic

Joe Graziano with May Seminar Speakers Alison Sanders and Hun Bok Jung

This seminar/webinar consisted of two talks related to health impacts and exposure to arsenic.  Alison P. Sanders, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Preventive Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented, "Early life metal exposure and epigenetics: a transdisciplinary approach".
Hun Bok Jung, recent Postdoctoral Research Associate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) gave a talk on "Spatial and temporal scales of redox trapping of groundwater arsenic through hyporheic zone in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta".

The seminar took place at Columbia University's Lamont Campus and was also broadcast as a webinar. Links to the edited pdfs of the presentation slides for the two talks are available below. In addition there are links to related papers. If you would like more details on these presentation, you may contact the speakers directly via email: Dr. Alison Sanders <alison dot sanders at mssm dot edu> and Dr. Hun Bok Jung <<hunbok at hotmail dot com>.

Related link(s):
Sponsored by: NIEHS Columbia University Superfund Research Program
Location: Columbia University's Lamont Campus Comer Building, 1st floor conference room 61 Route 9W, Palisades NY

April 21 2014

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Pinar Keskin and Ben Bostick

Presenters and talks:

Dr. Pinar Keskin, Assistant Professor with the Department of Economics at Wellesley College presented, "Water Quality Awareness and Infant Health: The Role of Breastfeeding". Please find below a link to the paper Dr. Keskin authored with colleagues Gauri Kartini Shastry and Helen Willis.

Dr. Benjamin Bostick, Lamont Associate Research Professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, gave a talk on ""Potential Alternative Water Sources in Arsenic-Impacted Areas of Cambodia".

Here is the more detailed agenda of the seminar/webinar:

3:00pm-4:00pm
“Water Quality Awareness and Infant Health: The Role of Breastfeeding”
Pinar Keskin

Assistant Professor
Department of Economics
Wellesley College

4:00pm-4:05pm Break

4:05pm-5:00pm

“Potential Alternative Water Sources in Arsenic-Impacted Areas of Cambodia”
Benjamin Bostick
Lamont Associate Research Professor
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Columbia University
 

 

Sponsored by: NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: Columbia University, EHS Conference Room (room 1101), Allan Rosenfield Building (eleventh floor), Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168 Street, New York City

January 27 2014

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Karagas on Arsenic Exposure & Pregnancy in NH; Guo on Paths of Arsenic & Iron Cycling in Inner Mongolia

Left to Right: Lex van Geen, Margaret Karagas from Dartmouth Medical School, Huaming Guo from China University of Geosciences, and Joe Graziano

This seminar/webinar consisted of two talks related to health impacts and exposure to arsenic. Margaret Karagas, Professor and Vice Chair of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School presented, "Sources and impact of arsenic exposure during pregnancy in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study". Huaming Guo, Professor at the School of Water Resources & Environment, China University of Geosciences gave a talk on, "Iron isotope approach for characterizing pathways of coupled arsenic and iron cycling in high arsenic groundwater: A case study in the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia".

The seminar took place at Columbia University's Lamont Campus and was also broadcast as a webinar.

 

Invitees: All interested in the topics
Sponsored by: Columbia University NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: Columbia University Lamont Campus
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Presentation by Dr. Huaming Gua10.85 MB

December 16 2013

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Sumon & Mozumder talk on As field testing implications; Guilarte on Mn Neurological Impacts

CU SRP December 2013 Seminar- from left to right: Joe Graziano, Ershad Sumon, Rajib Mozumder, Tom Guilarte, & Lex van Geen

Ershad Sumon, Project Manager of the Arsenic Testing Program, University of Dhaka and M. Rajib Mozumder, Columbia SRP Graduate Student with the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, presented, "Implications for mitigation of the recent field-kit testing of 50,000 wells for arsenic in Araihazar, Bangladesh".

Tomas R. Guilarte, Leon Hess Professor & Chairman of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Director of the NIEHS Training Grant and Deputy Director of the NIEHS Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan, gave a talk on "Neurological Consequences of Chronic Manganese Exposure: Behavioral, Neuroimaging and Neuropathological Findings".

Here is the more detailed agenda of the seminar/webinar:

3:00pm-4:00pm
"Implications for mitigation of the recent field-kit testing of 50,000 wells for arsenic in Araihazar, Bangladesh"

Ershad Sumon
Project Manager
Arsenic Testing Program
University of Dhaka, Bangladesh
and
M. Rajib Mozumder
Columbia SRP Graduate Student
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Columbia University

4:00pm-4:05pm Break

4:05pm-5:00pm
"Neurological Consequences of Chronic Manganese Exposure: Behavioral, Neuroimaging and Neuropathological Findings"

Tomas R. Guilarte
Leon Hess Professor & Chairman
Director, NIEHS Training Grant
Deputy Director, NIEHS Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan
Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Mailman School of Public Health
Columbia University

5:00pm Adjourn

Sponsored by: NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: Columbia University, EHS Conference Room (room 1101), Allan Rosenfield Building (eleventh floor), Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168 Street, New York City

November 18 2013

3:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Sara Flanagan: Barriers to Private Well Testing and Treatment in Maine

Sara Flanagan presenting her findings at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Annual Meeting in Nashville on 21 November 2013

Sara V. Flanagan, a scientist with the Columbia SRP Community Engagement Core (CEC), presented, "Overcoming barriers to environmental health protective behavior: Examples from private well testing and treatment for arsenic in Maine". Ms. Flanagan works at Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and is a doctoral student at City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Health. Ms. Flanagan has been working with Dr. Yan Zheng, PI of the CU SRP Community Engagement Core, to develop and apply innovative community participatory tools to target key behavioral factors so that the behavior of residents of Maine at risk from arsenic exposure can be better understood and changed to improve health. Household surveys were sent to homeowners through collaborating partner Maine Geological Survey to determine relationship between well-testing and treatment rates and psychological factors favoring or hindering taking these actions. This seminar will explain in more detail the tools used and the study findings.

 

Sponsored by: Columbia Superfund Research Program
Location: Columbia University's Lamont Campus, 1st floor conference room of the Comer Building, 61 Route 9W, Palisades NY.

October 21 2013

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Dibyendu Sarkar and Brandilyn Peters

Columbia University Superfund Research  Program 2013-2014 Seminar/Webinar Series

On October 21st, Dibyendu Sarkar Professor of Earth and Environmental Studies and Director of Environmental Management PhD Program at Montclair State University presented, "Urban Sprawl and 'Green' Remediation of Residential Soils: A Case Study With Arsenic". In addition Brandilyn Peters, PhD Candidate with the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health gave a talk on, "Arsenic metabolism and renal function in Bangladesh: exploring causal connections."

Dibyendu Sarkar Abstract
Arsenical pesticides have been used extensively in agriculture until recently that has left a legacy of arsenic-rich soils in the farmlands. Widespread urban sprawl - particularly in the last three decades - converted a larger number of former farmlands to residential properties in many metropolitan areas in the United States. This change in landuse from agricultural to residential has tremendously increased the potential of human exposure to soil arsenic, primarily via soil ingestion by hand-to-mouth activity in children. One of the more logical and cost-effective remediation methods for arsenic in residential scenarios is in-situ immobilization, which results in lowering arsenic bioavailability, hence, in reducing human health risk from chronic exposure to arsenic-rich soils. Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) promote soil immobilization of arsenic in a way that is both inexpensive and less ecologically disruptive. WTRs are by-products of the drinking water purification process that typically contain - depending on the treatment process - large amount of Al/Fe oxides that are largely amorphous and have high affinity for oxyanions due to both high specific surface and favorable pH dependent surface charge. We conducted short- and long-term, laboratory and greenhouse studies to investigate arsenic retention-release by Fe- and Al-based WTRs and WTR-amended soils. Arsenic bioaccessibility and in-vivo bioavailability were evaluated using in-vitro physiologically based extraction tests, and nude mice model, respectively. Aqueous and surface speciation of arsenic were studied, and risk analysis was performed. Although not yet tested in a landscape scale under natural conditions, incubation and greenhouse studies indicate that WTR amendment has the potential to develop into a cost-effective "green" remediation technology for arsenic enriched soils.

Location: EHS Conference Room (room 1101) Allan Rosenfield Building (eleventh floor) Mailman School of Public Health 722 West 168 Street, New York City

September 16 2013

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Ana Navas-Acien, Jing Sun

CU SRP Director Joe Graziano,CU SRP Graduate Student Jing Sun, and CU SRP Associate Director Lex van Geen following Jing's Seminar Presentation
Columbia University Superfund Research  Program 2013-2014 Seminar/Webinar Series
On Monday, September 16th, 2013 at Columbia University's Lamont Campus, Ana Navas-Acien, Associate Professor from the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, presented, "Low-to-moderate arsenic exposure in the US: Health implications for American Indian communities". In addition, Jing Sun, Columbia SRP Graduate Student at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, gave a talk on "Arsenic In-Situ Immobilization by Magnetite Formation within Contaminated Aquifer Sediments".

If you would like more details on these presentations, you may contact Dr. Ana Navas-Acien directly via email: anavas at jhsph dot edu  and/or Ms. Jing Sun at jingsun at ldeo dot columbia dot edu.

 

Related link(s):
Sponsored by: Columbia University NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location:Comer Building, 1st floor conference room, Columbia University Lamont Campus, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY

May 20 2013

3:00 pm

Zhou Yun and Yan Zheng

Dr. Zhou Yun from the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences presents a talk on Groundwater Environmental Management & Challenges in China

Director Zhou Yun of the International Cooperation Center at the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences (CRAES) presented, "Groundwater Environmental Management and Challenges in China". Dr. Yan Zheng, Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Queens College, CUNY, and Adjunct Senior Research Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory , Columbia University, gave a talk on the CU SRP Community Engagement initiatives,"MARCH: Maine Arsenic Reduction for Community Health".  In addition, Dr. Joseph Graziano, Director of the CU SRP, presented an Overview of the Columbia Superfund Research Program, and Dr. Alexander van Geen, Deputy Director, gave an introduction to, "The international drilling program and Columbia Global Center proposal on groundwater arsenic in Asia".

If you would like more details on these presentation, you may contact Yan Zheng directly via email: yzheng at ldeo dot columbia dot edu and  Zhou Yun: zhouyun at craes dot org dot cn.
 

Sponsored by: NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: Health Sciences Campus, Mailman School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Conference Room (room 1101), Allan Rosenfield Building (eleventh floor), 722 West 168 Street, NYC

April 15 2013

3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Miroslav Stýblo, Alexander van Geen

Lex van Geen, Miroslav Stýblo, Joe Graziano, & Mary Gamble at Columbia University Lamont Campus

The April SRP Seminar took place in the 1st floor Conference Room of the Comer Building on Columbia's Lamont Campus, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY.

Dr. Miroslav Stýblo, Associate Professor at Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, presented "Diabetes Associated with Environmental Exposure to Arsenic: The Phenotype and Mechanisms". Dr. Stýblo has background in nutritional biochemistry and biochemical toxicology. His research typically involves a translational or interdisciplinary approach. For more information please contact Dr. Styblo at styblo at med dot unc dot edu.

Dr. Alexander van Geen, Lamont Research Professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, gave a talk on "Myanmar and Bangladesh: Cultures at odds, with a groundwater arsenic problem in common". Dr. van Geen's research interests include the geochemical cycling of trace elements in natural and perturbed environments, particularly redox-sensitive processes affecting metals and metalloids. His research applications bridge disciplines, including the health and social sciences, to address multi-faceted environmental problems. For more information, please contact Dr. van Geen at avangeen at ldeo dot columbia dot edu.

Sponsored by: Columbia University NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location:Comer Building, 1st floor conference room, Columbia University Lamont Campus, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY

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