Archived Announcements

February 15 2013

Internship Opportunities for Students at NCEH and ATSDR

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR) offer paid 10-week summer internship programs for students who are passionate about the environment, interested in human health, and curious about how they are linked. During the course of the internship, students are introduced to environmental health at the federal level through collaborative projects, experiential learning opportunities, environmental health presentations, journal clubs, field trips, brown bag lunches, and mentoring relationships at NCEH/ATSDR.  Interns will be based at NCEH/ATSDR’s Chamblee, GA Campus.

For more information, please visit the programs web site:

Summer Program in Environmental Health (www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/SUPEH)

-Open to students who are enrolled fulltime in EHAC-accredited Environmental Health programs as a rising junior, senior, or graduate student.

-Application deadline: February 15th, 2013

-Contact: EHInternship@cdc.gov

Graduate Environmental Health program (www.cdc.gov/nceh/geh)

-Open to graduate students who are currently enrolled in a degree granting program. Students graduating in Spring 2013 are eligible for this opportunity.

 -Application deadline: February 27th, 2013

 -Contact: GEH@cdc.gov

Sponsored by: CDC NCEH/ATSDR
Announcement type: General Announcements

January 31 2013 to February 28 2013

KC Donnelly Externship Supplement Awards

This is an exciting opportunity to provide interdisciplinary experiences for SRP graduate students and post-docs either directly supported or conducting research supported by an SRP P42 or R01 grant.In honor of KC Donnelly, this supplemental award provides current SRP-funded graduate students and post-doctoral researchers with funding to pursue translational/transdisciplinary opportunities and experiences within other SRP-funded centers, government laboratories (EPA, ATSDR, NIEHS), or other agencies (state, local,Tribal).For more information, please review the KC Donnelly Externship Guidelines.

Sponsored by: NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Announcement type: General Announcements

November 1 2012

Study suggests large investment in Bangladesh water supply infrastructure would be justified

Two of Columbia's SRP Community Engagement Core scientists Sara Flanagan and Yan Zheng along with their colleague Richard Johnston published a paper in the November 2012 WHO Bulletin examining the health and economic impacts and implications for the mitigation of arsenic in tube well water in Bangladesh. A recent survey in Bangladesh estimates that 35 to 77 million people have been chronically exposed to arsenic in their drinking water. The health implications of chronic arsenic exposure in such a large population are substantial. Interventions in areas with the highest proportion of unsafe wells are likely to reach the population exposed to the highest arsenic concentrations and therefore at highest risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. This paper provides evidence that large investments in the water supply infrastructure to reduce levels of arsenic in drinking water is economically justified when the health and economic burdens of unabated arsenic exposure are considered.

Citation:

Flanagan, S.V., R.B. Johnston,and Y. Zheng. 2012. Arsenic in tube well water in Bangladesh: health and economic impacts and implications for arsenic mitigation.Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2012;90:839-846. doi: 10.2471/BLT.11.101253

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

October 24 2012

NIEHS celebrates SRP Silver Jubilee

The Superfund Research Program celebrated its 25th anniversary at the 2012  Annual Meeting in Raleigh, NC, 21-24 October .  To learn more about the history of the program and its research successes, download the new SRP commemorative booklet (link below). Look closely on the cover and you will see Columbia SRP Director Dr. Joseph Graziano. You may also access pdfs of the Annual Meeting's scientific sessions and presentations.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: General Announcements

October 19 2012

NIEHS SRP Risk e Learning Webinar Series

This seminar was the first in a three part series that coincides with the Superfund Research Program(SRP) 25th Anniversary and the 10th Anniversary of the SRP Risk e-Learning webinars. The SRP chose this opportunity to highlight the Program's accomplishments in the area of arsenic research. Since its inception, the SRP has funded work to understand the consequences of exposure to arsenic at the molecular and population levels.

Dr.  Joseph Graziano, presents a historical overview of the global human health issues related to drinking water. His presentation focuses on the sources and prevalence of arsenic exposures and the evolution of our understanding of the spectrum of human health impacts and how arsenic imparts negative effects. Dr. Margaret Karagas gives a brief overview of her epidemiology work that focuses on etiologic mechanisms and prevention of human cancers and other adverse health outcomes. She discusses recent findings from studies to develop biomarkers of arsenic exposure and susceptibility in a U.S. population that relies heavily on private drinking water systems where over 10% of the wells contain low to moderate levels of arsenic. She also presents information from her research, from her early studies investigating cancer risk to her more recent investigation into sources of arsenic exposure among pregnant women, e.g., via their consumption of rice and tap water, and the research translation activities that help raise awareness of the presence of arsenic in the drinking water supply.  Dr. A. Eduardo Saezwill focuses on his and Co-PI’s (Eric Betterton, Ph.D.) latest research that involves the characterization of windblown dust from mine tailings and will also touch on the University of Arizona SRP’s phytostabilization field study in the southwestern United States that uses native plants to successfully reduce the amount of dust coming off the tailings, thereby reducing potential aerial exposures.

Invitees: All interested in the topics
Sponsored by: NIEHS Superfund Research Program
Location: EPA Clu-in Training & Events Webinar
Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Announcements

August 17 2012

Water conservation case study and policy report

A new Rockland County water conservation case study and policy report was released August 17 by the Center for Regional Research, Education and Outreach at SUNY New Paltz. This discussion brief updates earlier work by the authors, Stuart Braman of Lamont-Doherty and Simon Gruber of the CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities, and places it in the context of the Hudson River valley.

Citation:

Braman, S., and S. Gruber, 2012. Water Conservation and Long-Term Water Supply Planning in the Hudson Valley: A Rockland County Case Study. Discussion Brief #7- Summer 2012. Center for Research, Regional Education and Outreach, State University of New York at New Paltz.
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PDF icon Full Case Study5.04 MB
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

May 7 2012

PEPH Webinar

Mapping and Environmental Public Health: Visualizing Health Disparities and the Effects of Pollution broadcast on Monday, May 7th featured three scientists from Columbia University's Superfund Research Project: Lex van Geen, Steve Chillrud, and Meredith Golden.

Alexander van Geen, Associate Director of the CU SRP, presented, "Field kits for arsenic, hand-held GPS receivers, and Google Earth: key technologies for reducing exposure to arsenic contained in groundwater across South and Southeast Asia." Steven Chillrud discussed spatial and temporal variations in specific particle-associated air pollutants in NYC from both regional and local sources, in his talk, "The air we breathe in NYC and spatial variability". Finally, Meredith Golden with assistance from Tricia Chai-Onn showcased, "The NPL Superfund Footprint: Site, Population, and Environmental Characteristics Mapper", a mapping tool to assist regulatory agencies, university researchers, private and non-profit sectors, and communities located near Superfund sites.

Click on the links below for a summary and an archived recording of the webinar on mapping and geospatial research.

Invitees: All interested in the topics
Sponsored by: PEHP
Location: NIEHS Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH) Webinar
Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Announcements

May 4 2012

NIEHS Awards Columbia SRP 5 year Multiproject Center Grant

The NIEHS recently announced its renewal of the Columbia University Superfund Research Program multi-project P42 grant for an additional five years, 2012-2017. The Columbia SRP will continue to focus on the complex set of geochemical, public health, and remediation issues surrounding exposures to arsenic and manganese in groundwater. The goal is to generate and communicate new scientific information for the creation and implementation of effective environmental policies to improve public health. NIEHS only made two P42 awards this year. The second is to The University of California at San Diego for the detection and models of toxicant exposure.

Announcement type: CU SRP Announcements

May 1 2012

IRIS Inputs Requested

The EPA Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) released its list of chemicals that have been selected for inclusion in its 2012 agenda. EPA is requesting information from the public for consideration in the development of these assessments. Two of the chemicals that may be of interest to SRP researchers are manganese and mercury. If you have publications that may be related to a risk assessment of either of these chemicals, you are encouraged to submit them at www.regulations.gov.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Announcements

February 23 2012

Variants Associated with Arsenic Metabolism and Toxicity Phenotypes in Bangladesh

A research team led by CU SRP PI Habibul Ahsan and Brandon Pierce, University of Chicago Medicine, with contributions by SRP scientists Marie Argos, Joseph Graziano, Mary Gamble, Faruque Parvez, and Vesna Slavkovich has discovered genetic variants that elevate the risk for skin lesions in people chronically exposed to arsenic, as part of the first large-scale genomic studies in a developing country. Genetic changes found near the enzyme for metabolizing the chemical into a less toxic form can significantly increase an individual's risk for developing arsenic-related disease (summary link below).

Citation:

Pierce BL, Kibriya MG, Tong L, Jasmine F, Argos M, et al. (2012) Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Chromosome 10q24.32 Variants Associated with Arsenic Metabolism and Toxicity Phenotypes in Bangladesh. PLoS Genet 8(2): e1002522. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002522
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PDF icon Press Release28.86 KB
PDF icon Full paper557.77 KB
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

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