Archived Announcements

March 31 2016

How would arsenic behave in sulfidic environment?

Contributing to the development of solutions to the difficult problem of remediating aquifers with elevated dissolved arsenic concentrations, Columbia SRP postdoctoral researcher Jing Sun in collaboration with Andrew Quicksall of Southern Methodist University and Columbia SRP scientists from Projects 4 and 5 Steven Chillrud, Brian Mailloux, and Benjamin Bostick have published an article in the June 2016 issue of Chemosphere titled “Arsenic mobilization from sediments in microcosms under sulfate reduction.” The team is focused on designing and evaluating enhanced remediation approaches for sites with arsenic contaminated groundwater. Arsenic sulfide precipitation has often been suggested as a remediation option for such sites. In this paper, they reported results from laboratory studies where they stimulated microbial sulfate reduction within microcosms containing contaminated sediments, and evaluated whether this process would immobilize arsenic for use in groundwater remediation. The sediments used were collected from two distinct sites: the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site in southern New Jersey and a former heavy metal sulfide mining site, the Coeur d’Alene mining district in northern Idaho. The research team found that although transient arsenic removal from solution occurred in microcosms with these sediments, overall arsenic was released from sediments to solution. Based on this study and other published studies on sulfate reduction, the research team has proposed a generalized conceptual model that describes how iron and sulfur are cycled in a sulfidic environment, which includes both insoluble sulfide minerals and soluble sulfide complexes, to better ascertain conditions under which sulfide phases immobilize arsenic. The article was initially published online on March 31, 2016.

Citation:

Sun J, Quicksall AN, Chillrud SN, Mailloux BJ, Bostick BC. Arsenic mobilization from sediments in microcosms under sulfate reduction. Chemosphere 2016 June; 153:254–261.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

February 27 2016

Oxalic acid is a promising amendment for enhanced pump-and-treat to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination

Columbia SRP postdoctoral researcher Jing Sun along with Columbia SRP scientists from Projects 4 and 5 Benjamin Bostick, Brian Mailloux, Jamie Ross, and Steven Chillrud have published an article reporting their research to address the challenging task of remediating aquifers with elevated dissolved arsenic concentrations. Traditional pump-and-treat approaches are used at many arsenic contaminated aquifer sites even though the mass transfer of arsenic off of sediments is slow. Our group has investigated whether in situ injections of oxalic acid can increase the mass transfer into the aqueous phase, which is removed by pumping, and thus decrease the time required for effective remediation. In this paper, the team focused on whether residual sediment arsenic after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. The sediments used were from the Dover Municipal Landfill (Dover, New Hampshire) and the Vineland Chemical Company (Cumberland County, New Jersey) Superfund sites, which had different arsenic input sources, levels, and redox conditions. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed on the sediments in the laboratory. The authors found that oxalic acid mobilized arsenic from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although at different efficiency rates. They also found that the residual arsenic in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment but that there was still sufficient labile arsenic in the treated Vineland sediments to make them vulnerable under reducing conditions. Thus, they conclude that oxalic acid could potentially improve the efficiency of the widely used pump-and-treat remediation. The study “Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions” is reported in the July 2016 issue of the Journal of Hazardous Materials. The article was initially published online on February 27, 2016.

Citation:

Sun J, Bostick BC, Mailloux BJ, Ross JM, Chillrud SN. Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions. Journal of Hazardous Materials 2016 July; 311:125–133.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

January 15 2016

RTC PI Meredith Golden Retires after Long Career in Environmental Health

Meredith Golden demonstrates the National Priorities List (NPL) Superfund Footprint Mapper at the 2012 Lamont-Doherty Open House in Palisades, NY.

After more than 35 years working in the field of environmental health, Meredith Golden, senior research associate at the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), has retired. Golden joined the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network in Saginaw, Michigan, 22 years ago, with a background in economics, medical geography, and epidemiology. She relocated to Columbia when CIESIN became an Earth Institute Center in 1998. She has served as a principal investigator of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Columbia Superfund Research Program, leading the interdisciplinary Research Translation Core (RTC) and coordinating development of the National Priorities List Superfund Footprint Mapper, a decision-making tool for researchers, regulators, and community partners. Golden also led the environment and health mission area of the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center and contributed to other CIESIN and Earth Institute activities on health and hazards. Going forward, Golden plans to continue to use her public health expertise in assisting communities in environmental education and hazard mitigation.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Announcements

December 11 2015

Superfund 35th Anniversary

December 11, 2015 marks the 35th anniversary of the enactment of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund).

Related link(s):
Announcement type: General Announcements

November 18 2015

2015 Superfund Research Program Annual Meeting

Northeastern University’s Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT) Superfund Research program will be hosting  the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico from Wednesday, November 18 through Friday, November 20th. The theme for this meeting is "SRP Collaboration for Innovation"

Puerto Rico is the main study site for the Northeastern SRP PROTECT program. It is a U.S. territory with a Latino population facing significant environmental challenges, including the presence of 16 active Superfund sites and a number of major public health issues. Puerto Rico’s preterm birth rate has risen dramatically in recent years, and has recently seen elevated rates of autism, asthma, childhood and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Many of these challenges overlap with those being addressed by other SRP grantees across the U.S. The 2015 Annual SRP Meeting will emphasize the need for SRP scientists to collaborate with each other and government partners to apply their research findings and technologies to help reduce these and other environmental public health concerns.

For more information please see:  http://www.northeastern.edu/srp2015/

Announcement type: General Announcements

October 23 2015

A Potential Long-Term Arsenic Immobilization Strategy by Nitrate-Iron(II) Addition

Columbia SRP student Jing Sun, Columbia SRP scientists Steven Chillrud, Brian Mailloux, Martin Stute, and Benjamin Bostick, along with colleagues Rajesh Singh, Hailiang Dong, and Christopher Lepre have co-authored a publication in the journal Chemosphere entitled, "Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate." The article reports the results of laboratory microcosm experiments conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site in Cumberland County, New Jersey. The authors found that magnetite is an advantageous host-mineral for As immobilization. The study represents an initial attempt to produce relatively stable As sequesters by simultaneous addition of ferrous Fe and nitrate. The paper was published online on October 23, 2015. The print version will be available in the February 2016 issue of Chemosphere. Benjamin Bostick is the corresponding author.

Citation: Sun J, Chillrud SN, Mailloux BJ, Stute M, Singh R, Dong H, Lepre CJ, Bostick BC. Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate. Chemosphere 2016 Feb; 144:1106–1115. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.09.045

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

June 26 2015

Diverse Stakeholders Partner to Reduce Arsenic Exposure and Health Effects

Following the Human and Environmental Sustainability Summit on Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic in August 2014, participants from both public and private sectors, including CU SRP RTC scientist Meredith Golden, collaborated to co-author, “MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic”. This paper summarizes the summit findings and proposes a plan for reducing arsenic exposure globally through innovative policies and effective actions. The lead author and the Summit convener, Dr. Bruce Stanton is the Director of the Dartmouth Superfund Research Program. The paper was published online on June 26, 2015 by Current Environmental Health Reports (dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40572-015-0057-9). The print version will be available in the September issue.

Citation:

Stanton, B.A., et al. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic. Current Environmental Health Reports, September 2015, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 329-337. Available online 26 June 2015. DOI 10.1007/s40572-015-0057-9.

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

May 18 2015

"Uncovering early life exposure to chemical mixtures using tooth matrix biomarkers"

Please see related papers by Dr. Manish Arora and his colleagues at the Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine.

Announcement type: General Announcements

May 15 2015

CU SRP Randomized Trial Shows High Daily Dose of Folic Acid Alone Lowers Blood Arsenic

CU SRP student Brandilyn Peters and scientist Dr. Megan Hall, along with Dr. Gamble (PI, R01 CA133595 and PI of CU-SRP Project 3), investigate the impact of folate and/or creatine supplements in reducing blood arsenic levels in Bangladeshi adults. Ingested arsenic undergoes hepatic methylation generating mono- and di-methylated arsenicals; the latter are more readily excreted in urine. Folic acid and creatine supplementation, by influencing the availability of methyl groups, have the potential to enhance arsenic methylation. We have found previously that folic acid enhances arsenic methylation and lowers blood arsenic in folate deficient individuals. In a new randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 622 Bangladeshi adults, we tested whether folic acid and/or creatine supplementation lowers blood arsenic in a mixed folate replete/deficient study population. We found that supplementation with 800 ug folic acid/day lowered blood arsenic to a greater extent than placebo over the 12 and 24 week time periods of the trial, while the other treatments (400 ug folic acid/day, 3 g creatine/day, and 3 g creatine + 400 ug folic acid/day) did not. Folate fortification in arsenic-endemic countries may facilitate a partial reduction in the public health burden of arsenic exposure. The manuscript “Folic acid and creatine as therapeutic approaches to lower blood arsenic: A Randomized-Controlled Trial” is available as an Advance Publication on the Environmental Health Perspectives web site as of May 15, 2015. The copyedited and formatted version will appear online and in print soon.

Citation:
*Peters BA, *Hall MN, Liu X, Parvez F, Siddique AB, Shahriar MH, Slavkovich V, Ilievski V, Factor-Litvak P, Graziano JH, Gamble MV. Folic acid and creatine as therapeutic approaches to lower blood arsenic: A Randomized-Controlled Trial.  Envir Health Persp May 15, 2015 (ePub ahead of print). DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409396

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

April 23 2015

Does oxidized plasma glutathione redox potential increase inflammation and renal dysfunction in arsenic exposed Bangldeshi adults?

Columbia SRP student Brandilyn Peters, along with her CU SRP colleagues, found that study participants with lower plasma GSH and more oxidized plasma EhGSH were at risk of increased As-induced inflammation. Their paper, “Arsenic exposure, inflammation, and renal function in Bangladeshi adults: Effect modification by plasma glutathione redox potential” was published online in the April edition of Free Radical and Biology Medicine. The printed version should be available soon.

Arsenic exposure may cause inflammation and renal dysfunction via induction of oxidative stress. The plasma glutathione redox potential reflects an individual’s exposure to oxidative stress which may modify risk for arsenic-induced health outcomes. In a cross-sectional study of Bangladeshi adults, we tested whether arsenic exposure was associated with increased inflammation and decreased renal function, and whether these effects were stronger among those with a more oxidized plasma glutathione redox potential. Water, blood, and urinary arsenic were positively associated with plasma C-reactive protein, a biomarker of inflammation, only in participants with a more oxidized plasma glutathione redox potential. Blood and urinary arsenic had marginal negative associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate, and these associations were not significantly modified by the plasma glutathione redox potential. Antioxidants should be explored as a treatment to prevent arsenic-induced inflammation.

Citation:
Peters BA, Liu X, Hall MN, Ilievski V, SlavkovichV, Siddique AB, Alam S, Islam T, Graziano JH and Gamble MV.  Arsenic exposure, inflammation and renal function in Bangladeshi adults:  effect modification by plasma glutathione redox potential.  Free Rad Biol Med April 23, 2015 (ePub ahead of print). DOI:10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2015.04.020. 

Related link(s):
Announcement type: CU SRP Publications

Pages

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer